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Shaykh Daoud’s Blog

The Selkirk Grace

with one comment

This is usually attributed to Robert Burns, although a variant of it was known in the 17th Century as the Galloway Grace or the Covenanters’ Grace. It is traditionally recited before eating the haggis at a Burns’ Night Supper on 25th January each year.

Scots:

Some hae meat and canna eat,
And some wad eat that want it,
But we hae meat and we can eat,
And sae the Lord be thankit.

Gaelic:

Tha biadh aig cuid, ‘s gun aca càil;
acras aig cuid, ‘s gun aca biadh;
ach againne tha biadh is slàint’;
moladh mar sin a bhith don Triath.

An English translation exists as:

Some have food and cannot eat,
And some would eat but have no food,
But we have food and we can eat,
And so the Lord be thanked.

© D Rosser-Owen 2011 All Rights Reserved

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Written by Daoud Rosser-Owen

February 6, 2011 at 8:00 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

One Response

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  1. Is Daoud Muslim?

    Loofa

    June 6, 2011 at 12:55 am


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